Ucl Ssees Essay Cover Sheet

10.1 How will students be assessed 

During your studies, you will find that there is significant variation in the types and style of assessment you are required to undertake. Alongside the traditional written essay or coursework and written examinations, you will find Multiple Choice Questionnaires (MCQs), online tests, oral presentations, book reviews, group projects and many other styles. In the following section you will find helpful hints on how to approach these which will help you maximise your performance. The forms of assessment for individual courses are detailed in their Course Outline and on Moodle.

Coursework assessment is sometimes ‘formally assessed’, which means that it contributes a percentage to the final mark of the course. All coursework assessments are compulsory and must be completed. Failure to complete assessed coursework may result in your being barred from examinations being deemed ‘incomplete’. Not all coursework contributes to the final percentage of a course mark: ‘formative’ coursework offers you the opportunity to develop your skills and receive feedback.

10.2 PG Forms of assessment

Several methods of assessment are used for SSEES courses. The standard methods are as follows. However, depending on the requirements of the module, there may be some degree of variation.

15 Credit Courses

  • 1x3000w Essay*
  • 2hr Unseen Examination & 1x1500w Essay

30 Credit Courses

  • 1x6000w Essay*
  • 2hr Unseen Examination & 1x3000w Essay
  • 2x 3000w Essay*
  • 3hr Unseen Examination

Language Courses

  • All language courses are assessed by a mixture of written examination and practical assessment.

10.3 What are the marking criteria and learning outcomes?

Undergraduate Marking Criteria

KNOWLEDGE

Equivalent Degree Classification% EquivalentKnowledge of problems involved, e.g. text, author, genre, period, linguistic phenomena, historical and social context, specialist literature on the topic. Evidence of capacity to gather information through a wide and appropriate range of reading, and to digest and process knowledge.
First (Excellent)80+Outstanding level of knowledge, well beyond what is normally encountered at undergraduate level.
First (Excellent)70-79Unusually extensively informed and material comprehensively synthesized.
Upper Second (Very Good)60-69Intelligent selection and use of appropriate material
Lower Second (Good)50-59Provides a satisfactory quantity of accurate information; shows familiarity with the basic literature
Third (Satisfactory)40-49Provides a limited amount of information with significant omissions.
Fail0-39Shows inadequate familiarity, information presented is incompetent in quantity and/or accuracy.

ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION

Equivalent Degree Classification% EquivalentDemonstrates a clear grasp of concepts. Application of appropriate methodology and understanding; willingness to apply an independent approach or interpretation; recognition of alternative interpretations; Use of precise terminology and avoidance of ambiguity; avoidance of excessive generalisations or gross oversimplifications
First (Excellent)80+Nuanced, subtle, original and perceptive analysis, with critical use of sources.
First (Excellent)70-79Distinctive, sophisticated and focused analysis, critical use of sources and/or insightful interpretation.
Upper Second (Very Good)60-69Displays ability to engage critically with the question and to analyse and evaluate material effectively
Lower Second (Good)50-59Competent understanding of the material, some critical insights presented but generally analytically ‘thin’.
Third (Satisfactory)40-49Limited understanding of the material and its significance providing a superficial or evasive answer.
Fail0-39No evident sense of what the material means.

STRUCTURE & ARGUMENT

Equivalent Degree Classification% EquivalentDemonstrates ability to structure work with clarity, relevance and coherence. Ability to argue a case; clear evidence of analysis and logical thought; recognition of an arguments limitation or alternative views; Ability to use other evidence to support arguments and structure appropriately.
First (Excellent)80+Ambitious, impressively well-organised and nuanced argument.
First (Excellent)70-79Sustained, coherent and well- supported argument is presented.
Upper Second (Very Good)60-69A clear and coherent argument is presented.
Lower Second (Good)50-59Provides an adequate, appropriate argument.
Third (Satisfactory)40-49Poor grasp of the relevance of source material to what is being argued, weak organisation and structure.
Fail0-39Incomplete answer or absence of coherent argument

PRESENTATION & DOCUMENTATION

Equivalent Degree Classification% EquivalentAccurate and consistently presented footnotes and bibliographic references; accuracy of grammar and spelling; correct and clear presentation of charts/graphs/tables or other data. Appropriate and correct referencing throughout. Correct and contextually correct handling of quotations
First (Excellent)80+Outstanding presentation and full and appropriate documentation of sources.
First (Excellent)70-79Excellent presentation and full and appropriate documentation of sources.
Upper Second (Very Good)60-69High standard of presentation including appropriate documentation.
Lower Second (Good)50-59Satisfactory standard of presentation and grasp of appropriate principles of documentation.
Third (Satisfactory)40-49Limited care and competence in documentation and presentation.
Fail0-39Inadequate grasp of appropriate principles of documentation and presentation.

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

Equivalent Degree Classification% EquivalentLanguage modules only**
First (Excellent)80+Outstanding in all respects.
First (Excellent)70-79Exhibits excellence and sophistication across the constituent elements of language proficiency.
Upper Second (Very Good)60-69Displays a high level of competence across the constituent elements but may contain a significant number of errors, whilst not seriously impairing communication.
Lower Second (Good)50-59Demonstrates a general competence across the constituent elements but may contain a wide range of errors which have a significant impact on communication.
Third (Satisfactory)40-49Achieves limited communication despite numerous and varied errors in the constituent elements, particularly in morphology and syntax
Fail0-39Unable to achieve communication due to wide ranging error in the constituent elements.

**for language modules examined with a fixed marking scheme that produces a raw mark (0-100), the raw mark is scaled with appropriate grade boundaries to provide a final mark in the range 0-85%.

Postgraduate Marking Criteria

KNOWLEDGE

Equivalent Degree Classifkation% EquivalentECTS
IMESS GRADE EQUIVALENT
Knowledge of problems involved, e.g text, author, genre, period, linguistic phenomena, historical and social context, specialist literature on the topic. Evidence of capacity to gather information through a wide and appropriate range of reading, and to digest and process knowledge.
Distinction (Excellent)80+AOutstanding level of knowledge, well beyond what is normally encountered at undergraduate level.
Distinction (Excellent)70-79AComprehensive level of knowledge, ability to synthesise an exceptionally wide range of materials.
Merit (Very good)60-6965 - 69 B
60 - 61 C
A high level of knowledge, ability to synthesise a very wide range of materials.
Pass (Good)50-5955 - 59 D
50 - 54 E
Ability to engage in in-depth reading and to synthesise material from wide range of sources.
Fail0-49FAILShows a poor familiarity with relevant information and an inability to synthesise material from a range of sources.

ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION

Equivalent Degree Classifkation% EquivalentECTS
IMESS GRADE EQUIVALENT
Demonstrates a clear grasp of concepts. Application of appropriate methodology and understanding; willingness to apply an independent approach or interpretation; recognition of alternative interpretations; Use of precise terminology and avoidance of ambiguity; avoidance e of excessive generalisations or gross oversimplifications
Distinction (Excellent)80+ANuanced, subtle, original and perceptive analysis, with critical use of sources.
Distinction (Excellent)70-79ADistinctively sophisticated and focused analysis, critical use of sources and insightful interpretation.
Merit (Very good)60-6965 - 69 B
60 - 61 C
A high level of analysis, critical use of sources and insightful interpretation.
Pass (Good)50-5955 - 59 D
50 - 54 E
Demonstration of a critical use of sources and ability to engage in systematic inquiry..
Fail0-49FAILDemonstrates failure to use sources and an inadequate ability to engage in systematic inquiry.

STRUCTURE & ARGUMENT

Equivalent Degree Classifkation% EquivalentECTS
IMESS GRADE EQUIVALENT
Demonstrates ability to structure work with clarity, relevance and coherence. Ability to argue a case; clear evidence of analysis and logical thought; recognition of an arguments limitation or alternative views; Ability to use other evidence to support arguments and structure appropriately.
Distinction (Excellent)80+AAmbitious, impressively well-organised and nuanced argument.
Distinction (Excellent)70-79AOutstanding ability to formulate a convincing and coherent argument independently
Merit (Very good)60-6965 - 69 B
60 - 61 C
A high standard of argument, which is sustained, coherent and effective.
Pass (Good)50-5955 - 59 D
50 - 54 E
A sound ability to present a sustained, coherent and effective argument.
Fail0-49FAILFailure to present a sustained, coherent and effective argument.

PRESENTATION & DOCUMENTATION

Equivalent Degree Classifkation% EquivalentECTS
IMESS GRADE EQUIVALENT
Accurate and consistently presented footnotes and bibliographic references; accuracy of grammar and spelling; correct and clear presentation of charts/graphs/tables or other data. Appropriate and correct referencing throughout. Correct and contextually correct handling of quotations
Distinction (Excellent)80+AOutstanding presentation and full and appropriate documentation of sources.
Distinction (Excellent)70-79AExcellent presentation and comprehensive documentation.
Merit (Very good)60-6965 - 69 B
60 - 61 C
Very good presentation and comprehensive documentation.
Pass (Good)50-5955 - 59 D
50 - 54 E
Good presentation skills and appropriate documentation of all sources.
Fail0-49FAILInadequate grasp of appropriate principles of documentation and presentation.

RESEARCH SKILLS

Equivalent Degree Classifkation% EquivalentECTS
IMESS GRADE EQUIVALENT
(Dissertation Only)
Distinction (Excellent)80+AOutstanding in all respects.
Distinction (Excellent)70-79AComprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to the chosen field of research, showing an ability to engage in sustained independent research.
Merit (Very good)60-6965 - 69 B
60 - 61 C
Good understanding of techniques applicable to the dhosen field of research, showing an ability to engage in sustained independent research.
Pass (Good)50-5955 - 59 D
50 - 54 E
An ability to engage in sustained research work, demonstrating methodological awareness.
Fail0-49FAILInadequate evidence of ability to engage in sustained research work and poor understanding of appropriate research techniques.

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

Equivalent Degree Classifkation% EquivalentECTS
IMESS GRADE EQUIVALENT
Language modules only"
Distinction (Excellent)80+A
Distinction (Excellent)70-79AExcellent knowledge of vocabulary and mastery of translation difficulties including excellent English style in translation and summary work.
Merit (Very good)60-6965 - 69 B
60 - 61 C
Very good knowledge of vocabulary and mastery of translation difficulties including very good English style in translation and summary work.
Pass (Good)50-5955 - 59 D
50 - 54 E
Good knowledge of vocabulary and mastery of translation difficulties including good English style in translation and summary work.
Fail0-49FAILInadequate knowledge of vocabulary and mastery of translation difficulties including poor English style in translation and summary work.

**for language modules examined with a fixed marking scheme that produces a raw mark (0-100), the raw mark is scaled with appropriate grade boundaries to provide a final mark in the range 0-85%.

10.4 How will marks be combined to reach a classification?

Social and Historical Sciences 3 Year Programmes – All SSEES UG programmes with the exception of Languages and Culture

Degree classification will be calculated on the basis of the median of results in modules to the value of 9.0 course units, to be selected and weighted as follows:

First year:  the best course unit (or two half units) with a weighting of 1
Second year: all four course units, with a weighting of 3
Final year: all four course units, with a weighting of 5

Marks for retaken or substitute modules will be included in the calculation for the year of study in which the module was first attempted.

Social and Historical Sciences 4 Year Programmes with a Year Abroad Programmes – All SSEES UG programmes with the exception of Languages and Culture

PASS/FAIL YEAR ABROAD ONLY – NOTE: THIS APPLIES TO ALL STUDENTS STARTING IN 2016/17 OR LATER

Degree classification will be calculated on the basis of the median of results in modules to the value of 9.0 course units, to be selected and weighted as follows:

First year:  the best course unit (or two half units) with a weighting of 1
Second year: all four course units, with a weighting of 3
Final year: all four course units, with a weighting of 5

The year abroad does not contribute to the classification calculation, but must be passed. See 12.12 below for consequences of failure of the year abroad.
Marks for retaken or substitute modules will be included in the calculation for the year of study in which the module was first attempted.

YEAR ABROAD PROJECT – NOTE: THIS WILL APPLY TO ALL STUDENTS STARTING BEFORE 2016/17

Degree classification will be calculated on the basis of the median of results in modules to the value of 10.0 course units, to be selected and weighted as follows:

First year:  the best course unit (or two half units) with a weighting of 1
Second year: all four course units, with a weighting of 3
Year abroad: the year abroad project, with a weighting of 5.
Final year: all four course units, with a weighting of 5

Marks for retaken or substitute modules will be included in the calculation for the year of study in which the module was first attempted.

Arts and Humanities 4 Year Programmes with a Year Abroad – Only SSEES UG Languages and Culture programmes

PASS/FAIL YEAR ABROAD ONLY – NOTE: THIS APPLIES TO ALL STUDENTS STARTING IN 2016/17 OR LATER

Degree classification will be based on a mean of weighted year means, calculated as follows and rounded to the nearest integer:

First year: the mean of the best 3 course units is given a weighting of 1
Second year: the mean of the best 3.5 course units is given weighting of 3
Final year: the mean of all four course units is given a weighting of 5.

The year abroad does not contribute to the classification calculation, but must be passed. See 12.12 below for consequences of failure of the year abroad.

Marks for retaken or substitute modules will be included in the calculation for the year of study in which the module was first attempted.

YEAR ABROAD PROJECT – NOTE: THIS APPLIES TO ALL STUDENTS STARTING BEFORE 2016/17

Degree classification will be based on a mean of weighted year means, calculated as follows and rounded to the nearest integer:

First year: the mean of the best 3 course units is given a weighting of 1
Second year: the mean of the best 3.5 course units is given a weighting of 3
Final year: the mean of the marks for all four final year course units and the Year Abroad Project is given a weighting of 5.

Marks for retaken or substitute modules will be included in the calculation for the year of study in which the module was first attempted.

10.5 Feedback

Students can expect to receive written feedback on formally-assessed coursework, usually within a maximum of four weeks from the submission deadline. If there are delays in providing feedback for individual courses, students will be notified of this before the four weeks have passed. 

Feedback can be provided in either paper form, which will be returned to students or electronically via Moodle on Turnitin. Please visit Guidance for students collecting marks and feedback from Turnitin for a detailed walk through on the electronic feedback.

Individual assessments can be discussed with individual staff during office hours or by appointment.

Additionally, students may receive verbal or written feedback in class or on non-assessed coursework. Feedback methods are described in the Course Outline.

UG Students writing a free-standing dissertation or a History dissertation may send their supervisor a draft of up to 2000 words by 31st January 2018. The supervisor will provide general feedback rather than detailed commentary on style and argument. Feedback will be by email OR at a supervision meeting, followed by an email summary. The equivalent deadlines and word counts for MA students are 3000 words by 1st July 2018

MRes students: see the MRes Handbook, p. 9.

Questions or concerns about the timing of the return of coursework can be sent to ssees-student@ucl.ac.uk in the first instance.

OFFICE HOURS

Students can meet members of staff to discuss academic matters without appointments during their specified office hours. Each member of staff will post a notice of these hours outside his/her office at the start of each term. They are available on the Current Students page of the SSEES website: www.ucl.ac.uk/ssees/current-students.

If consultation is required at other times, please make appointments or email the tutor first.

10.5.1 Collection of Work

While we aim to have majority of your feedback provided via Turnitin there might be some pieces of coursework where hard copies will be marked by academic staff and returned as such to you. SSEES endeavours to return work to students within 4 weeks of the submission date (not including bank holidays). If work is returned as hard copies you are going to be emailed by the Student Administration Office once your work is ready for collection. Please note that work cannot be kept in the Student Administration Office and will be archived if it has not been collected within six weeks of its releaseback to you. Requesting it after this date may result in a significant delay to retrieve it later.

10.6 UCL Standard turnaround time for feedback

UCL Feedback Turnaround Policy

Regular feedback is an essential part of every student’s learning. It is UCL policy that all students receive feedback on summative assessments within one calendar month of the submission deadline. This feedback may take the form of written feedback, individual discussions, group discussions, marker’s answers, model answers or other solutions (although students should note that UCL is generally unable to return examination scripts or comments on the same). Students writing dissertations or research projects should also expect to receive feedback on a draft on at least one occasion.

If, for whatever reason, a department/division cannot ensure that the one calendar month deadline is met then they will tell students when the feedback will be provided - it is expected that the extra time needed should not exceed one week. Where feedback is not provided within the timescale, students should bring the matter to the attention of their Departmental Tutor or Head of Department.

Feedback on Examinations

All continuing students will be able to access markers’ comments on individual examination scripts, in line with the Joint Faculty Examinations Feedback Policy.  Further information will be circulated to all students during Term 1.

Further information:

10.7 Examinations

Students must ensure that they are aware of the regulations governing written examinations detailed in the UCL Examination Guide for Candidates on the Examinations and Awards website. Students should pay particular attention to the regulations around examination irregularities. Students who are suspected of any form of cheating or of breaching the Examination Regulations will be investigated under UCL’s Examination Irregularities and Plagiarism procedures. 

Intercollegiate Exams

UCL students taking examinations at other colleges as part of the University of London’s Intercollegiate Scheme must abide by the regulations of the college they are attending. Similarly, students from other colleges taking examinations at UCL are subject to UCL’s regulations for examinations.

Further information:

10.8 Coursework submission

During your studies, you will find that there is significant variation in the types and style of assessment you are required to undertake. Alongside the traditional written essay or coursework and written examinations, you will find Multiple Choice Questionnaires (MCQs), online tests, oral presentations, book reviews, group projects and many other styles. In the following section you will find helpful hints on how to approach these which will help you maximise your performance. The forms of assessment for individual courses are detailed in their Course Outline and on Moodle.

Coursework assessment is sometimes ‘formally assessed’, which means that it contributes a percentage to the final mark of the course. All coursework assessments are compulsory and must be completed. Failure to complete assessed coursework may result in your being barred from examinations being deemed ‘incomplete’. Not all coursework contributes to the final percentage of a course mark: ‘formative’ coursework offers you the opportunity to develop your skills and receive feedback.

Further details on completing assessments are contained in the Study Skills Handbook which is available on the SSEES website:www.ucl.ac.uk/ssees/current-students.  

You are expected to submit work on time as required and in return you can expect to receive your work back promptly.

Deadlines

The dates for coursework assessment deadlines are determined by individual Course Tutors and are clearly set out in the course materials made available at the start of the course.

Electronic Submission

An electronic copy of each assessment must be submitted via the Course Moodle page by 11:59 PM on the day of the deadline. By submitting on Moodle, you will be confirming your agreement with the UCL Plagiarism Statement.

Submission through Moodle also submits the assessment to Turnitin.

If you encounter difficulties submitting your assessment electronically, you should contact your Programme Administrator or ssees-student@ucl.ac.uk.

Routine computer problems such as viruses, disk corruption, printer problems or printer queues, and short term network problems are not acceptable grounds for lateness or for requesting an extension to the submission deadline. You are expected to take proper precautions and make back-up copies of your data or ensure adequate time for electronic submission.

10.9 Information about penalties for late submissions

Late Submission Penalties

Planning, time-management and the meeting of deadlines are part of the personal and professional skills expected of all graduates. For this reason, UCL expects students to submit all coursework by the published deadline date and time, after which penalties will be applied.

If a student experiences something which prevents them from meeting a deadline that is sudden, unexpected, significantly disruptive and beyond their control, they should submit an Extenuating Circumstances (EC) Form. If the request is accepted, the student may be granted an extension. If the deadline has already passed, the late submission may be condoned i.e. there will be no penalty for submitting late.

Further information:

10.10 Information about absence from assessment

Absence from Assessment

Any student who is absent from an assessment will receive a mark of zero unless they obtain authorisation for the absence and formally defer their assessment to a later date by submitting a request for Extenuating Circumstances. Absences from assessment need to meet the criteria for Extenuating Circumstances and be supported by appropriate evidence. If Extenuating Circumstances are not approved, the mark of zero will stand.

In line with UCL’s obligations for students studying under a visa, Tier 4 students must also obtain authorisation for any absence from teaching or assessment activities under the Authorised Absence procedures.

Further information:

10.11 Information about word counts and penalties

Word Counts

Assignment briefs will include clear instructions about word counts, as well as any special provisions concerning the inclusion of footnotes, diagrams, images, tables, figures and bibliographies etc. (Normal SSEES practice about what is included in the word count is set out in the table below.) Students are expected to adhere to the requirements for each assessment. Students exceeding these parameters may receive a reduction in marks.

  • For work that exceeds a specified maximum length by less than 10% the mark will be reduced by five percentage marks, but the penalised mark will not be reduced below the pass mark: marks already at or below the pass mark will not be reduced.
  • For work that exceeds a specified maximum length by 10% or more the mark will be reduced by ten percentage marks, but the penalised mark will not be reduced below the pass mark: marks already at or below the pass mark will not be reduced.

In the case of coursework that is submitted late and is also over-length, the greater of the two penalties will apply.

The following table describes the normal practice at SSEES:

Included in word countNot included in word count
Main text of essayBibliography/list of references
Illustrative material such as tables and charts, either in the main part of the essay or in an appendixTitle of essay (and title page, if one is provided)
Footnotes, endnotes and citationsAbstract
Student number
Appendices containing information about a dissertation’s methodology, e.g. list of interviewees, interview schedule
Translations of quotations (where required)

EXCEPTION: Students writing assessment (typically in Economics and Business topics) which involve econometric analysis may include additional tables or graphs in an appendix with descriptive statistics, variable definitions, extra regression tables etc. These additional materials in the appendix will NOT count towards the word count. The main tables and graphs that are central to the argument being made in the assessment should be included in the main body of the dissertation and WILL contribute to the word count. 

In case of doubt about what is included, students should check with the module organiser.

Further information:

10.12 Information about the consequences of failure

Reassessment

The Programme Scheme of Award describes the modules which students must complete and pass in order to achieve their degree. Where a student fails to meet these requirements at the first attempt, and there are no Extenuating Circumstances material to that failure, they may be reassessed on one more occasion only, unless they have been awarded a degree, are eligible for the award of a degree, or have been excluded from UCL on the grounds of academic insufficiency or as a result of misconduct. Students who have passed a module are not permitted to resit or repeat that module.

Students who fail in up to 60 taught credits will be required to Resit in the Late Summer Assessment Period. Students failing 60 or more credits will be required to Repeat the module(s), with tuition, in the following academic year.

There are separate provisions for students who fail due to Extenuating Circumstances - the Extenuating Circumstances Panel will determine the nature and timing of the Deferral, which may be offered with or without tuition/ attendance.

Students who fail a Masters dissertation/ research project will normally resit by 31 January. Exceptionally, the Exam Board may decide that the extent of failure is such that the student needs to Repeat the dissertation with tuition and fees.

Taught Postgraduate students who meet the Condonement Criteria will meet the Progression and Award Requirements and will not be permitted a further attempt.

Capping of Reassessment Marks

The marks for modules passed at the second attempt will be capped at the Pass Mark: 40% for modules at levels 4, 5 and 6 and 50% for modules at level 7. Students who defer their first attempt due to Extenuating Circumstances will not have their marks capped. Students deferring their second attempt (i.e. who have Extenuating Circumstances on a Resit or Repeat) will have their marks capped.

Further information:

Withdrawal from Examinations on Academic Grounds

You may withdraw your entry to an examination on academic grounds only with the approval of Departmental and Faculty Tutors. This withdrawal must be made using the official form (Withdrawal from Examination on Academic Grounds) and Faculty approval must have been obtained by the end of the first week of the third term. If you should absent yourself without prior approval, then you will be marked absent and deemed to have made an attempt at the examination. If a withdrawal from an examination or assessment is approved, you will be expected to take the assessment in the next academic session.

‘Late Assessment’

If through illness, you are prevented from attending any course-unit examination, you may apply to the UCL for late assessment via the Extenuating Circumstances procedure.

The application must be made within one week of the date of the examination in question and should be made using the Extenuating Circumstances form and submitted to ssees-extenuating-circumstances@ucl.ac.uk. Your application must be accompanied by appropriate supporting documentation (normally a medical certificate).

Late Assessment will not be allowed in any circumstances where prior planning could have made it unnecessary.

Further information is available at: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/srs/academic-manual/c4/extenuating-circumstances/student-support#top

Failure of a Year Abroad

Where a student fails a Year Abroad, either owing to interruption, non-engagement or failure to achieve the pass mark, there is no opportunity for reassessment of the Year Abroad and the student must transfer to an equivalent degree where there is no Year Abroad requirement.

Timing of Reassessment

Reassessment must be made at the next scheduled occasion, which from 2017/18 will take place during the Late Summer Assessment Period (Monday 20 August – Friday 07 September 2018).

Year Abroad Students

Students who are on a Year Abroad at the time of the next scheduled occasion will be re-examined during the late assessment period in the summer following their Year Abroad.

MRes Taught Modules

MRes students who are enrolled on an integrated MRes/Doctoral programme will normally be offered reassessment of any taught elements over the summer of the same year to allow them to progress on time.

Masters/ MRes Dissertation/ Research Project

The Programme Board of Examiners will determine whether the student should either:

a) Resubmit the dissertation in the same academic session, or

b) Interrupt and re-register in the following academic session in order to resubmit at the end of the first term and be considered for the award of a degree in January, or

c) Interrupt and re-register in the following academic session in order to resubmit at the next scheduled occasion and be considered for the award of a degree at the end of that academic session.

Where a student must be reassessed in a significant proportion of the taught modules, and this might affect performance in the dissertation or research project, the Programme Board of Examiners may recommend that the student undertakes the reassessment for the taught modules in the current academic session, and re-registers in the following academic session in order to resubmit their dissertation.

Format of Reassessment

Students will normally only be reassessed in those module components which they have failed.

10.13 Information about accepted referencing methods on the programme

Study Skills Handbook

The SSEES Study Skills handbook provides detailed guidance on study, essay writing, referencing and revision methods and is available from the Current Students page of the SSEES website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ssees/current-students/undergraduate.

10.14 Information about academic integrity (plagiarism) in the discipline

Examination Irregularities and Plagiarism

Plagiarism is defined as the presentation of another person's thoughts or words or artefacts or software as though they were a student's own.

Plagiarism constitutes an examination offence under the University Regulations and it important that you understand what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it. UCL regulations governing plagiarism apply to all student work, including examinations, assessed coursework and non-assessed coursework.

All UCL students are required to read the UCL guidance on plagiarism as well as the SSEES Study Skills Handbook which includes advice on presentation and referencing. All assessed coursework is required to be submitted to Turnitin®, a sophisticated detection system which scans student work for evidence of plagiarism by matching text from student assessments to billions of sources worldwide, including websites and journals, as well as work previously submitted to SSEES, UCL and other universities.

Please refer to the UCL website for information on plagiarism (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/current-students/guidelines/plagiarism)

English Language Support

The UCL Language Centre offers an In-session English for Academic Purposes Course which provides on-going language support for overseas students who are studying as undergraduates or graduates at UCL or other colleges of the University of London. For further information see http://www.ucl.ac.uk/clie/english-for-academic-purposes.  The course cannot be taken as an option within a SSEES degree programme and must be paid for separately.

10.15 Information about UCL’s examination irregularities and plagiarism procedures

Examination Irregularities and Plagiarism

UCL students are expected to be aware of and adhere to UCL’s referencing and examination requirements as a condition of their enrolment:

  • For examinations, the UCL Examination Guide for Candidates is published annually on the Examinations and Awards website. All candidates for written examinations must ensure they are familiar with the requirements for conduct in examinations set out in this guide.
  • For coursework submissions, students must ensure that they are familiar with the UCL Library Guide to References, Citations and Avoiding Plagiarism which provides detailed guidance about UCL’s referencing and citation requirements. Students should also ensure that they are familiar with the specific referencing requirements of their discipline.

UCL will use plagiarism detection software to scan coursework for evidence of plagiarism against billions of sources worldwide (websites, journals etc. as well as work previously submitted to UCL and other universities). Most departments will require students to submit work electronically via these systems and ask students to declare that submissions are the work of the student alone.

Any student suspected of examination misconduct, plagiarism, self-plagiarism, collusion, falsification or any other form of academic misconduct which is likely to give an unfair advantage to the candidate and/or affect the security of assessment and/ or compromise the academic integrity of UCL will be investigated under the Examination Irregularities and Plagiarism procedures. If misconduct is found, students are likely to be failed for that assignment and/ or module. Serious or repeated offences may lead to failure of the whole year, suspension or even expulsion. A breach of copyright or intellectual property laws may also lead to legal action.

Further information:

10.16 Information about research ethics, approvals process, code of conduct, etc. on the programme

Please contact your Programme Coordinator if you require to go through the research ethics approval process.

10.17 Information about Marking, Second-Marking and Moderation

Marking, Second-Marking and Moderation

All work that is submitted for summative assessment is marked by a UCL Internal Examiner or Assistant Internal Examiner. All UCL programmes also include rigorous second-marking and internal moderation processes to ensure that marking is consistent and fair. Second-marking can take a number of different forms depending on the type of assessment, but the overall aim is to ensure that marking is as accurate as possible. Internal moderation also helps UCL to ensure that marking is equitable across different modules, pathways, options and electives.

This system is designed to ensure that all students receive an appropriate mark for their work and judged according to the marking criteria agreed by SSEES Teaching Committee, which follows guidance set by UCL.

Marks communicated to students during the academic year remain provisional until they are confirmed by the Board of Examiners. In practice they are most unlikely to change and the word ‘provisional’ does not imply that students can negotiate higher marks with their course tutors.

If you receive a mark with which you are unhappy, you should first review the feedback you have been given, as this should contextualise the mark for you. If you remain unsure of why you received this mark you should arrange to meet with either your Course Tutor or your Personal Tutor to discuss your concerns and to explain the feedback to you.

UCL regulations do not allow for work to be remarked at the request of a student. 

SSEES assessment criteria are available on the Current Students page of the SSEES website.

10.18 Information about the External Examiner process and how to access reports via Portico

External Examining at UCL

External Examiners are senior academics or practitioners from other universities who help UCL to monitor the quality of the education we provide to our students. In particular, External Examiners scrutinise the assessment processes on each programme, helping UCL to ensure that all students have been treated fairly, that academic standards have been upheld and that the qualifications awarded are comparable with similar degrees at other UK universities.

Each External Examiner submits an annual report. Faculties and departments are required to reflect on any recommendations and address any issues raised in a formal response. The report and response are discussed with Student Reps at the Staff-Student Consultative Committee, and are scrutinised by faculty, department and institution-level committees. Students can access their External Examiner’s report and departmental response via their Portico account or by contacting their Departmental Administrator in the first instance or Student and Registry Services directly at examiners@ucl.ac.uk.

First-year foundation (‘core’) modules

SEHI1001 - Seminars in History

SEHI1002 - Modern Historiography

SEHI0004 - World Histories

SEHI1004 - Frontiers of History

Group 1a (intermediate)

SEHI6006 - History of the Habsburg Monarchy, 1700-1918*

SEHI6008 - History of Russia to 1598

SEHI6009 - History of Russia, 1598-1856*

SEHI6011 - History of Modern Germany 1815-1990

SEHI6012 - SSEES History Taught Short Dissertation with Coursework

Group 1b half-module units (advanced)

SEHI7002 - Fascism and Authoritarianism in Eastern Europe, 1918-1945*

SEHI7004 - Between Politics and Culture: German Ideas, 1890-1970

SEHI7005 - Themes in Romanian History: From Dacians to Democrats

SEHI7008 - The Balkans from Empires to Nation-States

SEHI7009 - The Age of the Extremes in the Balkans

SEHI7010 - History of the Soviet Union

SEHI7011 - Society and Politics in Late Imperial Russia

SEHI7012 - Czechoslovakia in the Age of Extremes

Group 2 (advanced)

SEHI2002 - Crown Church and Estates in Central Europe, 1500-1700*

SEHI2006 - Successors to the Habsburgs: East-Central Europe, 1914-1945

SEHI2007 - The Rise and Fall of Yugoslavia

SEHI2008 - The Fall and the Rise of the Polish Nation, 1648-1921

SEHI2009 - Media, Culture and Society in the Soviet Union from Stalin to 1991*

SEHI2010 - Dictatorship as experience. The coexistence of consensus and refusal in the German Democratic Republic.

Group 3 special subjects with dissertation (advanced)

SEHI3005/9005 The Russian Revolution*

SEHI3006/9006 - Ivan the Terrible and the Russian Monarchy in the Sixteenth Century (I & II)

SEHI3007/9007 - Urban Culture and Modernity: Vienna-Prague-Budapest, 1857-1938 (I & II)

SEHI3008/9008 - Mass Culture in an Age of Revolution: Russia 1900-1934 (I & II)

SEHI3009/9009 - Monarchs and the Enlightenment in Russia and Central Europe (I & II)*

SEHI3012/9012 - Life Writing: Memory and Identity in Twentieth Century Europe

SESS3110 - Crisis and the New Global Revolutions

Free-Standing Dissertation (advanced)

SEZZ4901 - Free-Standing Dissertation 

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