Cultural Differences Essay Conclusion Transitions

What are compare and contrast transition words? Before you can understand what they are, you should know the use of transition words and phrases first. Fundamentally, those words and phrases help on making essays easier to read.

In addition, they allow the readers to transition from one topic or point to another. They enhance the understandability and logical organization of an article by helping the readers know the relationship of the previous and following sentence and/or paragraph in the paper they are reading.

Contrast and Comparison

As the term implies, compare and contrast transition words are transitional phrases/words that show comparison and contrasting relation of two ideas. They are also used to emphasize negative and positive ideas. For you to have a clue on what exactly are they, here is a list of the most common contrast and compare transition words and phrases that are used in everyday writing and speech.

Contrast:

  • A clear difference
  • But
  • Conflicting viewpoint
  • Despite
  • Even so
  • For all that
  • However
  • In another way
  • Larger
  • Nevertheless
  • On one hand
  • Pro
  • Rather
  • Slower
  • Still another
  • The antithesis of

Comparison:

  • In the same way
  • By the same token
  • Similarly
  • In like manner
  • Likewise
  • In similar fashion

Both:

  • By the same token
  • Conversely
  • Likewise
  • On the other hand
  • Rather
  • Similarly
  • Yet
  • However
  • Nevertheless
  • In contrast

Here are some examples on how to use contrast and compare transitional words.

  1. Contrasting Transition Example
  2. First sentence: I want to buy an ice cream.

    Second sentence: My mother does not want me to buy an ice cream.

      Contrast 1: I want to buy an ice cream, but my mother does not want me to buy one.
      Contrast 2: I want to buy an ice cream. However, my mother does not want me to buy one.
      Contrast 3: I want to buy an ice cream; unfortunately, my mother does not want me to buy one.
  3. Comparison Transition Example
  4. First sentence: I eat ice cream slowly.

    Second sentence: I eat cotton candies slowly.

      Comparison 1: I eat ice cream slowly, in the same way I eat cotton candies.
      Comparison 2: I eat ice cream slowly. Likewise, I eat cotton candies slowly, too.
      Comparison 3: I eat ice cream slowly; similarly, I eat cotton candies slowly, too.

The examples above demonstrate how to use both type of transition words. As you can see, the sentences are now easier to read than the sentences without the transition words. Also, you have now a clearer understanding on how the ideas of the sentences are related.

Using compare and contrast transition words are very easy. Nevertheless, they can greatly affect your article’s readability and quality in a positive way. Ergo, make sure you always use them.

Author:

Dr. Michael Babcock is a Professor of Humanities at the Liberty University, Virginia. He wrote “The Stories of Attila the Hun’s Death: Narrative, Myth, and Meaning” (2001) and was a guest speaker at academic conferences on language origins and the philosophy of consciousness topics. Since 2008, he delivers help with academic papers on behalf of Professional Custom Essay Writing Service at freshessays.com.

Transitions

One of the best ways to improve any essay is by incorporating transitions. Effective transitions are what enable the main idea(s) and important points in an essay to flow together. In a sense, it is transitions that make a paper become an actual essay as opposed to just a random assortment of various facts. Without them, an essay will often seem to be lacking in unity. 

How do you know that you need better and/or more transitions? If your paper seems choppy, lacking in flow, or generally unorganized, these are all signs that your paper is lacking transitions. Also, the longer an essay is and the more points that are presented, the greater the need for transitions to connect all of the important ideas. 

  • Transitions should occur at a variety of places in an essay. They should be present between sentences in a body paragraph and between the body paragraphs themselves. 
  • Transitions between sentences are often only one word (however, therefore, etc.) or a brief series of words. These allow the reader to move from one sentence to the next and show how all sentences are related together. 
  • Transitions between paragraphs are slightly more complex as they move the reader from one main idea to the next.  These become particularly important in longer essays where more information is presented.   

The following examples provide a paragraph without transitions, followed by a revised paragraph that contains them:

  • Example #1:  Students who write academic essays need to provide effective transitions. Transitions allow writers to connect the main ideas that are present in an essay. Using conjunctive adverbs and other introductory elements allow a writer to connect one sentence to the next. The use of these words will make the writing more fluent and less choppy.  Many students fail to use effective transitions, and the essay comes across as disconnected. Writers should always be aware of the need to connect both sentences and paragraphs together.

Notice how the paragraph above contains valuable information about the use of transitions, but the sentences seem disconnected. It reads as if there are several ideas that are simply thrown together. Now read the paragraph below and see how using a few minor transitions allows the sentences and the information in them to be more connected (the transitions that have been added are in bold):

  • Revised Example #1: Students who write academic essays need to provide effective transitions. It is the use of these transitions that allow writers to connect the main ideas that are present in an essay. For example, by using conjunctive adverbs and other introductory elements, a writer can easily connect one sentence to the next. Moreover, the use of these words will make the writing more fluent and less choppy. Unfortunately, students often fail to use effective transitions, and, as a result, the essay comes across as disconnected. To avoid this, writers should always be aware of the need to connect both sentences and paragraphs together, and they should strive to find creative ways to do so. 

The following is a categorized list of transitional words that can be used, depending on the type of transition that is needed:

To Add: additionally, in addition, again, besides, moreover, what’s more, equally important (also important), finally, further, furthermore, first (second, third, etc.) next, lastly

To Repeat: as mentioned, as has been noted, in brief

To Show Exception: however, nevertheless, in spite of, yet, still, despite, of course, once in a while, sometimes, unfortunately

To Compare: however, on the other hand, on the contrary, in contrast, whereas, but, yet, nevertheless, by comparison, compared to, conversely, up against, balanced against, but, although, meanwhile, after all, while this may be true

To Emphasize: indeed, certainly, in any case, without a doubt, obviously, definitely, extremely, in fact, absolutely, positively, naturally, surprisingly, emphatically, unquestionably , undeniably, without reservation, always, never

To Prove: furthermore, moreover, in example, in fact, indeed, because, for, since, for the same reason, for this reason, obviously, evidently, besides, in addition, in any case

To Give an Example: for example, for instance, to demonstrate, to illustrate, as an illustration, in another case, take the case of, on this occasion, in this situation

To Show Sequence: as a result, subsequently, consequently, concurrently, following this, now, at this point, afterward, simultaneously, thus, hence, therefore, first (second, third, etc.)

To Show Time: immediately, thereafter, then, soon after, next, and then, finally, later, previously, formerly, first (second, third, etc.)

To Summarize or Conclude: In conclusion, as demonstrated, to conclude, summing up, in brief, as a result, therefore, accordingly, consequently, hence, on the whole

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